Black History Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links
Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address Address - Historical - 1835 Address - July 4th - 1822, Connecticut Address - Why Are You A Christian - 1795 Benjamin Franklin's letter to Thomas Paine Discourse - The Birthday of George Washington - February, 1852 Discourse - July 4th - 1796, Massachusetts Discourse - July 4th - 1798, Connecticut Discourse - Settlement of Cape Cod - 1839 Dissertation - Right & Obligation of Civil Magistrate - 1804 Elias Boudinot's Age of Revelation The Founders As Christians The Founders on Gambling George Washington's Farewell Address "Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death" Importance of Morality and Religion in Government The Importance of Voting and Christian Involvement in the Political Arena John Jay on the Biblical View of War Letters Between the Danbury Baptists and Thomas Jefferson Oration - Anniversary of Continental Congress - 1874 Oration - July 4th - 1787, New York Oration - July 4th - 1796, Massachusetts Oration - July 4th - 1801, Massachusetts Oration - July 4th - 1804 Oration - July 4th - 1808 Oration - July 4th - 1810 Oration - July 4th - 1810, Massachusetts Oration - July 4th - 1812, Massachusetts Oration - July 4th - 1822 Oration - July 4th - 1825, Massachusetts Oration - July 4th - 1826 Oration - July 4th - 1826, Cambridge Oration - July 4th - 1826, Massachusetts Oration - July 4th - 1827, Boston Oration - July 4th - 1831, Boston Oration - July 4th - 1831, Quincy Oration - July 4th- 1837 Oration - July 5th - 1824, Quincy Proclamation - Humiliation and Prayer - 1812 Qualifications for Public Office Sermon - American Institutions & the Bible - 1876 Sermon - Artillery - Boston, 1809 Sermon - Artillery Election - 1808 Sermon - Artillery-Election - 1792 Sermon - Atlantic Telegraph - 1858 Sermon - Battle of Lexington - 1776 Sermon - Battle of Lexington - 1778 Sermon - Before Judges - 1681 Sermon - Bridge Opening - 1805 Sermon - Bridge Opening - 1808 Sermon - Century - 1801 Sermon - Century - 1801 Sermon - Century - 1801 Sermon - Century Church Anniversary - 1814 Sermon - Christianity & Infidelity - 1880 Sermon - Christian Love - 1773 Sermon - Christian Patriot - Boston, 1840 Sermon - Christmas - 1788 Sermon - Christmas - 1838 Sermon - Christmas - 1841 Sermon - Christmas - 1843 Sermon - Christmas - 1844 Sermon - Church and Country - 1891 Sermon - Civil War - 1861 Sermon - Commercial Distress - 1837 Sermon - Communism in Churches - c. 1960 Sermon - Death of George Washington - 1800 Sermon - Dueling - 1805 Sermon - Dueling - Albany, 1838 Sermon - Earthquakes - 1755 Sermon - Easter - 1910 Sermon - Election - 1769 Sermon - Election - 1771 Sermon - Election - 1775 Sermon - Election - 1778 Sermon - Election - 1783 Sermon - Election - 1784 Sermon - Election - 1785 Sermon - Election - 1786 Sermon - Election - 1787 Sermon - Election - 1788 Sermon - Election - 1788 Sermon - Election - 1789 Sermon - Election - 1790 Sermon - Election - 1791 Sermon - Election - 1791 Sermon - Election - 1791 Sermon - Election - 1792 Sermon - Election - 1792 Sermon - Election - 1793 Sermon - Election - 1794 Sermon - Election - 1796 Sermon - Election - 1796 Sermon - Election - 1796 Sermon - Election - 1797 Sermon - Election - 1798 Sermon - Election - 1799 Sermon - Election - 1800 Sermon - Election - 1800 Sermon - Election - 1801 Sermon - Election - 1802 Sermon - Election - 1803 Sermon - Election - 1804 Sermon - Election - 1805 Sermon - Election - 1812 Sermon - Election - 1814 Sermon - Election - 1816 Sermon - Election - 1818 Sermon - Establishing Public Happiness - 1795 Sermon - Eulogy - 1854 Sermon - Execution - 1770 Sermon - Execution - 1796 Sermon - Execution - 1797 Sermon - Execution - 1848 Sermon - Fasting - 1783, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1798 Sermon - Fasting - 1798 Sermon - Fasting - 1798 Sermon - Fasting - 1798 Sermon - Fasting - 1798, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1799 Sermon - Fasting - 1799 Sermon - Fasting - 1799, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1801, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1805, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1805, New Hampshire Sermon - Fasting - 1808, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1809, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1810, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1810, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1810, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1811, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1812 Sermon - Fasting - 1812 Sermon - Fasting - 1812 Sermon - Fasting - 1812 Sermon - Fasting - 1812 Sermon - Fasting - 1812, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1814, Massachusetts Sermon - Fasting - 1815 Sermon - Fasting - 1832, MA Sermon - Fire - 1840 Sermon - Fire - 1840 Sermon - Fugitive Slave Bill - 1851 Sermon - George Washington's Birthday - 1863 Sermon - Giving - 1877 Sermon - Great Fire in Boston - 1760 Sermon - Hampshire Missionary Society - 1802 Sermon - House of Representatives - 1822 Sermon - House of Representatives - 1822 Sermon - House of Representatives - 1854 Sermon - House of Representatives - 1858 Sermon - House of Representatives - 1860 Sermon - House of Representatives - 1864 Sermon - In Boston - 1814 Sermon - The Infirmities and Comforts of Old Age - 1805 Sermon - Influence of the Gospel upon Intellectual Powers - 1835 Sermon - July 4th - 1794 Sermon - July 4th - 1825, Pennsylvania Sermon - Liberty - 1775 Sermon - Life & Character of Joseph Smith - 1877 Sermon - Living Faith - 1801 Sermon - Loss of Children - 1832 Sermon - Marriage - 1837 Sermon - Memorial Day Sermon - Memorial Day Sermon - Memorial Day - 1875 Sermon - Mexican War - 1848 Sermon - Modern Emigrant - 1832 Sermon - Moral Uses of the Sea - 1845 Sermon - Moral View of Rail Roads - 1851 Sermon - New Planet - 1847 Sermon - New Year - 1799 Sermon - New Year - 1861/ 1862 Sermon - Old Age Improved - 1811 Sermon - Ordination - 1779 Sermon - Ordination - 1790 Sermon - Ordination - 1793 Sermon - Ordination - 1817 Sermon - Overcoming Evil With Good - 1801 Sermon - People Responsible for Character of Rulers - 1895 Sermon - Perjury - 1813 Sermon - Prayer - 1799 Sermon - Property Tax - 1816 Sermon - Protestant Episcopal Church Convention - 1792 Sermon - Protestant Episcopal Church Convention - 1799 Sermon - Sabbath Day - 1803 Sermon - Saul Consulting Witch of Endor - 1806 Sermon - Slavery - 1791 Sermon - Snow and Vapor - 1856 Sermon - Society in Cambridge - 1802 Sermon - Society in Saybrook - 1803 Sermon - Solar Eclipse - 1806 Sermon - Stamp Act Repeal - 1766 Sermon - State Prison - 1812 Sermon - Succes Failure in Life - 1833 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1783 Massachusetts Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1785 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1794 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1795 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1795 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1795 Massachusetts Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1795 Pennsylvania Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1795 Philadelphia Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1798 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1798 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1798 Connecticut Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1803 Connecticut Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1804 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1804 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1808 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1814 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1815 Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1850 New York Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1852 Massachusetts Sermon - Thanksgiving - 1864 Connecticut Sermon - The Voice of Warning to Christians - 1800 Should Christians - Or Ministers - Run For Office? Speech - House of Representatives - 1881 Thomas Paine Criticizes the Current Public School Science Curriculum
The 2010 Election: The News Inside the News 4th of July Article Advancing the Sanctity of the Unborn Life in the Ft. Hood Massacre Affidavit in Support of the Ten Commandments African American History Resources The Aitken Bible and Congress America's Religious Heritage As Demonstrated in Presidential Inaugurations America’s Most Biblically-Hostile U. S. President The American Revolution: Was it an Act of Biblical Rebellion? American Voters and the Abortion Issue Analyzing Legislation An Article V Convention of the States Benjamin Rush Dream about John Adams and Thomas Jefferson The Bible and Taxes The Bible, Slavery, and America's Founders A Black Patriot: Wentworth Cheswell Bob Barr Crosses the Line Calling Muslims to the Capitol? Celebrating Thanksgiving In America A Christian Voter Intimidation Letter from Americans United for Separation of Church and State Christmas With the Presidents Christmas-As Celebrated by the Presidents Church in the U.S. Capitol Churches And Elections - What Is The Law? Confronting Civil War Revisionism: Why The South Went To War Congress, the Culture, and Christian Voting A Constitutional Amendment Restoring Religious Freedom David Barton & the ADL David Barton on President's Day Deconstructionism and the Left Defending The Jefferson Lies: David Barton Responds to his Conservative Critics Did George Washington Actually Say "So Help Me God" During His Inauguration? Echoes of 1860: Is "Life" a Question of State's Rights? Election 2004: A Moral Mandate? Election Resources and Information Electoral College: Preserve or Abolish? Ensuring Judicial Accountability For State Judges Evolution and the Law: “A Death Struggle Between Two Civilizations” Five Judicial Myths The Founders And Public Religious Expressions The Founding Fathers on Creation and Evolution The Founding Fathers on Jesus, Christianity and the Bible The Founding Fathers and Slavery Franklin’s Appeal for Prayer at the Constitutional Convention Frequently Asked Questions Futile Intimidation Attempts George Washington, Thomas Jefferson & Slavery in Virginia God: Missing in Action from American History A Godless Constitution?: A Response to Kramnick and Moore Guns, Kids and Critics H.RES. 888 Health Care and the Constitution Hobby Lobby - They Got It Right Homosexuals in the Military Houses of Worship Free Speech Restoration Act How You Can Be Involved Impeachment of Federal Judges In Hoc Anno Domini Is President Obama Correct: Is America No Longer a Christian Nation? James Madison and Religion in Public The Jefferson Lies: Taking on the Critics John Adams: Was He Really an Enemy of Christians? Addressing Modern Academic Shallownes John Locke – A Philosophical Founder of America John Locke: Deist or Theologian? Judges: Should they be Elected or Appointed? Letter to Pastors about Welfare Comment on Beck Radio Show Limiting an Overreaching Federal Government: Is State Nullification the Solution? The Meaning of Thanksgiving Meet The ACLU MexicoPolicyLetter "One Nation Under God" Political Parties and Morality Potential Constitutional Problems With H.R. 3590 Private Property Rights Resolution Recommended Reading List Religious Acknowledgments in the Capitol Visitor Center Republic v. Democracy A Review of A&E’s "The Crossing" Revisionism: How to Identify It In Your Children's Textbooks Sample Letters to the Editor The Separation of Church and State Solving the Pledge of Allegiance Controversy Statement: David Barton on The Jefferson Lies Steps for Viewing Candidates Scorecards The Story of the Star Spangled Banner Taking On The Critics A Tale of Two Constitutions Ten Commandments Displays Ten Steps To Change America Tea Parties- Same Song, Second Verse Testimony of David Barton on Global Warming Testimony on Global Warming Thanksgiving in America Thomas Jefferson and Religion at the University of Virginia Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: The Search for Truth Treaty of Tripoli Unconfirmed Quotation: Franklin Principles of Primitive Christianity Unconfirmed Quotations War on God in America Was George Washington a Christian? The White House Attack on Religion Continues: Repealing Conscience Protection Why Christians Must Vote in This Election Your Vote Counts Video
A Soldier and a President 2011 Election Information 2011 ProFamily Legislators Conference Addressing Mass Murder and Violent Crime American History: Bachmann v. Stephanopoulos Are You Smarter Than a Fourth Grader? The Barbary Powers Wars A Call to Action Celebrate Columbus Day! Celebrate Constitution Day! Celebrate with Prayer! Celebrating Abigail Adams Celebrating Black History Month: The Rev. Francis J. Grimke Christmas Resolutions (2007) Congressional Prayer Caucus Conscience Protection Amendment - Call Your Senator Today! Conscience Protection Amendment Update The Constitution and the Minority - What Does it All Mean? The Cost of Signing the Declaration of Independence Daniel Webster: The Defender of the U.S. Constitution Deconstructionism Dr. Benjamin Rush Draftsman of the Declaration The Finger of God on the Constitutional Convention The Founders on the Second Amendment Founding Fathers on Prayer The Four Chaplains Free to Speak George Washington's Birthday Getting Out the Vote A God-Given Inalienable Right A God-Given Inalienable Right Under Direct Attack Happy Fourth of July! Happy Thanksgiving! Happy Thanksgiving! An Historic Look at Easter Honor a Veteran! How much do you know about the Constitution? The Jefferson Lies Join the Black Robe Regiment today! The Lesser Known Boudinot The Mayflower and Presidents - What do they have in common? National Bible Week 2007 NBC's "George Washington" and Spielberg's "Lincoln" Noah Webster President Eisenhower's One Nation Under God The Pulpit Initiative The Real Story Behind Old Glory Register Congregations to Vote! Remember the "date which will live in infamy" this Christmas Season Remembering Pearl Harbor Remembering the Reason for Christmas The Response: A Call to Prayer For a Nation in Crisis The Response: An Historic Event Restoring Courage: Standing in Solidarity With Israel Sanctity of Human Life Day Secretary of the Continental Congress Charles Thomson A Secular Oath? A Southern View of Black History? Thanksgiving 2007 Their Lives, Fortunes and Sacred Honor: Richard Stockton This Day in History: D-Day The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier - A Forgotten History? Vindicating American Exceptionalism The Webster Regiment Which President earned the nickname "Old Man Eloquent"? Who was known as “First in war, First in peace, First in the hearts of his countrymen”? World Trade Center Cross
Voter Resources

contribute




Sign up for our Mailing List!
Back to Issues and Articles



Ten Commandments Displays
David Barton - 09/2003

While there have been dozens of rulings striking down Ten Commandments displays (another indication that federal judges need to be appointed to the courts who are well-versed in original constitutional understandings); no ruling has been more publicized than that against Judge Roy Moore in Alabama. In that case, the 11th Federal Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a 5,280 pound granite monument of the Ten Commandments could not be displayed in the rotunda of the Alabama State Judicial Building.

The ACLU, Americans United for Separation of Church and State, and the Southern Poverty Law Center filed suit against the Ten Commandments display on behalf of three attorneys. And why did those attorneys want the monument removed? They alleged that they had been “personally offended” by the monument and “as a result, suffered direct injury.” A three-judge panel of the 11th Federal Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with them and prohibited the display.

In order to reach their decision, the panel of federal judges transformed themselves into an ecclesiastical council of theologians. They ruled that the version of the Commandments posted by Judge Moore was a “Protestant” version and that “Jewish, Catholic, Lutheran and Eastern Orthodox faiths use different parts of their holy texts as the authoritative Ten Commandments.”

Strange! I thought that “Do not kill” and “Do not steal” meant the same regardless of the version! In fact, I am not aware of any person in America who, after seeing the granite monument, would cry out, “I have just seen the 9th command forbidding perjury, but it is a Protestant version of the Ten Commandments that I just saw, so I cannot obey it for I am a Lutheran (or a Catholic, or a Jew, or whatever).”

The 11th Circuit had ignored an elementary principle of law—and thus a fundamental responsibility of the courts: establish the spirit and intent of a law before making any ruling about it. Signer of the Constitution John Dickinson had explained the importance of this legal principle:

[N]othing is more certain than that the forms of liberty may be retained when the substance is gone. In government, as well as in religion, “the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.” 2 Cor. 3:6

Actually, the Ten Commandments themselves were the result of God's demonstration of this principle. When God delivered the Commandments, He told Moses “According to the tenor of those words I have made a covenant with you” (Exodus 34:27). That is, God Himself declared that the Ten Commandments were merely the general theme (the tenor) of what He wanted - that is, “Don't steal,” “Don't kill,” “Don't commit perjury,” etc. were simply the summation of over 600 laws given at or about the same time.

That these laws simply represent the spirit of all civil and criminal laws was made clear by an elderly Texas woman, Esther Armstrong. Despite her advanced years, Esther maintained a ministry in local prisons and jails, frequently visiting the inmates, all of who considered her as their own grandmother. One day, one of the “jail-house-attorney” inmates (a prisoner who has become obsessed with the study of the law) told Esther in amazement: “Mama Esther? Did you realize that there are over one-hundred thousand laws that will put you in jail?” To which she promptly replied, “Do you realize that there are Ten that will keep you out?”

Nevertheless, the federal judges refused to consider the general purpose of the Commandments. Instead, they focused on theological minutia about which version of the Ten Commandments was on display (which they apparently felt completely competent to address) much in the same way that theologians of former generations vigorously debated such useless and inane topics as how many angels would fit on the head of a pin. Perhaps only a liberal activist judge, an ACLU attorney, or a member of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State (i.e., groups and individuals who have demonstrated their distaste for religion in general) would make this “theological” distinction - as they did in this case. I am quite sure that Judge Moore - just like 99.9 percent of Americans - was not aware (nor would he have cared) that there were allegedly different theological versions of the Commandments; as a judge he was concerned with general behavior, not theology. Furthermore, I firmly believe that no matter which version of the Ten Commandments Judge Moore would have displayed - whether Jewish, Catholic, Protestant, or one of each - the same arguments still would have been used against him.

The three theologians (Oops! My bad!!! I meant the three judges) in the 11th Circuit who delivered the decision even personally impugned Moore, comparing him to “those Southern governors who attempted to defy federal court orders during an earlier era.” Amazing! Apparently in the minds of those judges, Judge Moore's displaying the Ten Commandments must be a sin akin to racism! The three also forcefully pronounced to Moore a warning that when the time came, he would obey their order to remove the Commandments.

Following the 11th Circuit's decision, federal district judge Myron Thompson (who originally ruled against Moore before the case rose to the 11th Circuit) promptly issued his own order that the monument be removed - now! - even before Judge Moore's appeal to the Supreme Court had been filed. Judge Moore refused to comply with that order, and hundreds rallied outside the court building in an effort to prevent the removal of the monument. Dozens who exercised their First Amendment right “peaceably to assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances” were handcuffed and arrested, including an elderly woman in a wheel chair - one among hundreds willing to resort to peaceful civil disobedience in order to preserve respected symbols of our nation's heritage as well as the constitutional right to free exercise of religion. Amazing! Americans are being arrested for trying to preserve the nation's moral law rather than break it!

This same type of peaceful civil disobedience eventually turned the tide in the civil rights' protests of the early 1960s. When Americans saw blacks arrested and beaten by police simply for sitting in the wrong seat on a bus, or going to the wrong table in a cafe, public sentiment propelled legislators to action to provide a political solution. Such may well be the effect of the current arrests—if they continue for an extended period. Perhaps the current publicity will cause Christians to stand up not only for this display but also for those in their own local communities.

Interestingly, voices of condemnation against Judge Moore have been raised around the nation, alleging that he refuses to follow “the rule of law.” Such claims constitute some of the more civically-illiterate statements made in recent years. Consider: in every student civics or government book in America is a page on “How a Bill Becomes a Law.” Anyone who examines those pages will notice that the judiciary has no role in making law; laws come from bills passed by the legislature and signed by the president or governor. Since no such law has been passed in this case, what “rule of law” is Judge Moore not upholding? Can it actually be that these critics talking about “the rule of law” believe that an order by a single unelected federal judge is actually the equivalent of a law? Apparently so. Don't misunderstand: this is not to suggest that judicial rulings should be ignored based on the personal predilections of an individual in a case; however, this ruling goes against every deeply embedded legal standard in America's common law, and Judge Moore's refusal is not based solely on his selfish or personal inclinations. (To learn how deeply the Ten Commandments have been implanted into American law and traditions, read our legal brief on this issue.)

Following Judge Myron Thompson's edict, the other eight justices on the Alabama Supreme Court announced their unanimous opposition to Judge Moore's position and agreed to cooperate in the removal of the monument. Judge Moore was subsequently suspended from his judgeship by the Alabama Judicial Inquiry Commission for his refusal to comply with the federal judge's order.

Importantly, Judge Moore is elected (as are the other eight State Supreme Court judges) and therefore ultimately accounts directly to the people of Alabama, who can have the final say on this issue. When that time comes, the decision of the voters likely will not agree with the State's other Supreme Court judges or the State's Judicial Inquiry Commission. Moore was already well-known for his stand for the Ten Commandments before he was elected to the Supreme Court (he had already won three legal decisions on the Ten Commandments at the time of his election) and recent polls show that 77 percent of the State supports the display.

The U. S. Congress is well aware of the situation in Alabama, and the House has already taken direct action. Rep. John Hostettler introduced, and the House overwhelmingly passed (260-161), an amendment that prohibits federal funds from being used to enforce the judicial order against the display. Similarly, Rep. Robert Aderholt has introduced (and the House has twice passed) the Ten Commandments Defense Act, allowing State and local communities rather than federal judges to have the final say in displays of the Ten Commandments; the Senate Democrats have killed the bill each time. Sen. Wayne Allard (R-CO) has introduced a bill (S 1558) that applies powers from Art. III, Sec. 2 of the U. S. Constitution to restrict the federal judiciary's right to rule on this issue, but the bill is not likely to move unless Democratic Senators feel substantial pressure to do so. The monument was eventually removed from the Rotunda and relocated in a remote non-public room in the building. This is simply a reconfirmation of the overall judicial message of recent years: if you must have a religious expression, it must be done in private (like pornography), not out in public where others can see it.

This site belongs to WallBuilders, LLC, a Texas Limited Liability Corporation | PO Box 397 | Aledo, Texas | 76008 | Contact Us
powered by ChaseComputerServices.com   |   design by Blepo.   Terms and Conditions  Privacy Policy